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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
with respect to united nations convention on this they are fairly outrageous. and what they're looking for, at the end of the day is respect, respect out the table and respect for who they are and what they are doing. and semi-we can define the means to bring these two solitudes together because at the end of the day any conflicts, whether it's kinetic or otherwise, that adversely affects the sultry to that part of the world will have a fundamentally adverse impact on the global economy spent it's doing it now with china and japan. that's interesting, as you've got two of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises a fundamental question, and it's of ending this myth that economics draws people closer together. part of the title today is "mischief or miscalculation?." during the cold war, what was interesting is you can have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviets and if two and if to implement you it's about 15 others. there was a lot of heavy investment figuring out how to communicate and how to coordinate, how to deal with escalation, how do you talk
united nations to take control of the internet? jon: just in. new information out of egypt. reuters is reporting that egyptian president mohammed morsi has left the presidential palace after protesters fight with riot police outside the palace. of course he has been under intense pressure from his own people ever since he assumed autocratic powers and he has been engaged in a fight with the court system there. people have been very angry about what he has done. at any rate according to reuters he has left the presidential palace because of this, well, call them, demonstration, call them a mob. i'm not sure how you want to describe it but those are pictures outside the presidential palace in cairo. night has fallen there. we'll keep an eye on the situation. we have our steve harrigan there. we'll let you know as soon as we learn more. jenna: disturbing new signs al qaeda is on the rebound in parts of the middle east and after frica. the latest a large-scale al qaeda plot in jordan. they plan to hit deadly terror attacks in the capital and hit the u.s. embassy during the chaos. behind
recognized by the united nations. the joy short-lived. how israel's decision to pursue even more settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem may kill any hopes of peace. we'll dive deep lie into this issue. >>> rp says it's not changing plans for the controversial housing development in east of jerusalem also developments in east jerusalem. this is despite getting a diplomatic mackdown recently from australia, five european countries and the united states bought in on this yesterday. now here's why this is such a big deal. the proposed construction would effectively cut off the west bank from cities of like bethlehem and ramallah, will cut them off from jerusalem. and that's important for the palestinians, it would mean that they couldn't get to east jerusalem, which they would eventually claim as the capital of their nation if that is to be. the large israeli settlement town of ma ale adumim would be connected to jerusalem directly. vice president for new initiatives and a distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson international center. always good to talk to you. israel defined as i i
threat to the united states' national security. as chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, i got asked that all the time. i answered in two words: our debt. i think i surprised him. today 15 former senior national security officials who served across eight presidential administrations have formed a coalition to stress the need for elected officials to act. for not only has the passage of time exacerbated some of the economic problems, it has revealed a perhaps equally-dangerous political one. our inability to grapple with pressing fiscal challenges represents nothing less than a crisis in our democratic order. compounding the instability and unpredictability in a volatile world. our propositions for this coalition are simple. the national security of the united states depends on its economic health. that health must be insured by averting the immediate crises and by laying the groundwork for a rigorous, long-term program of debt reduction, smart investment, economic growth and lower income inequality. in national security spending, we can target investments much more efficiently in res
was elected and at the united nations signed and that dnot rep and bear arms and the united states would be signing on to a worldwide treaty with countries like syria and iran, in which would water down our right to bare arms. >> i noticed there was a spike in gun sales after the election, why is that? >> well, because of those things and president obama's history and the first term of regulations and executive orders, things like that to try to restrict guns, so, people are want to get guns and may be restricted and worried about government having guns and they reported that black friday was the single biggest sale of firearms in the history this have country and november was the single biggest for gun sales. >> mike: over the last 11 months in this country a new study came out. 2.5 million times in in country over the last 11 months, crimes have been prevented because of guns. >> where does the anti-gun group get it wrong? >> it was exactly, bob costas said. i think he actually said on this network, that guns always make situations more dangerous and saying things like that is just fa
nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're addressing some of these large issues here locally. particularly a recently announced demonstration of integrating care for coverage for the dual eligible. the dual eligible or individuals covered by medicare and medicaid. i don't know if you know this, but dual eligible operation represents 20% of the medicare population today and 31% of the cost. with excited to be part of this program under the strategic partnership with the company in dayton called care stories will be serving beneficiaries in clev
with china, they started to claim the island in 1971 after the united nations issued a report in 1969. there's potential where result exists in that area. and we have been, we -- in 1895, about 420. and for the first 75 years we have never received any claim from the republic of china, and after the u.n. report, they changed his position on this subject to claim the island. today, i don't want to get into the details of the island. this is forum and just have global nervous. but i'd like to point, you know, the audience to the two elements. this is not -- in south china sea, china is trying to advance. with the philippines and vietnam and other countries. they claim the islands at least in south china sea. east china sea there is an issue with japan. and from japan, -- [inaudible] the taiwan, the philippines, this is called -- from the viewpoint of china. violence exists in the pacific. china openly express their strong interest in the maritime security and also the territory along those islands. so these china sea, this is not isolated when. this is a kind of china military strategy to adva
francisco today. we bought naval forces from the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last year the united states released a new security strategy. most of you probably have not even heard of that, but i have to tell you this was a big deal. it was one of the fifth american security strategies that we have issued since the civil war. among the highlights of that security strategy was a strong statement that the united states had the highest economic and security interests in the asia pacific region. not in europe as has been for 100 years prior to that, than the asia pacific region. secondly, that we would maintain freedom of access throughout that region. in particular, we would maintain the sea lanes in that area, whatever the challenge might be. even as we reduce our defense budget, therefore we must maintain and would maintain a powerful navy, and that that navy would be charge
converted. we call it converting from post to park. repurposing those lands from national defense to environmental defense. and i believe it is probably the most accessful base conversion in the united states. if you haven't been to the presidio, i think you should try and make that. if you're from out of town, it's a spectacular transition there. so, these golden gate national parks that i happen to be the superintendent of has now become after 40 years the second most visited national park in our country. we get 14 million people a year that come to our parks. it has spectacular coastline, includes muir wood, alcatraz, we get to tell the stories, stories about essentially what you and your predecessors did this this area. our headquarters, fort mason, was the fisherman's wharf area was the port of embarkation for the wars in the pacific. just this week we brought in a world war ii 16-inch bottle ship gun to the marine head lands to put it up at battery townsly which would have been the pinnacle of coastal artillery in world war ii. so, we now have a canon or artillery collection
in a volatile world. ever proposition is simple. the national security in the united states depends on its economic health. that must be ensured by averting the immediate crisis, and by laying the ground short for the rigorous long-term program of the debt reduction, smart investment, economic growth, and lower income inequality. in the national security spending, we can target investments much more efficiently than response to threats that are evolving before our eyes. and resources need to be shifted towards them on military elements of the national security posture. in the immediate term, and by that i mean over the next four weeks, we must avoid driving the country over the fiscal cliff. no partisan ideology is worth the cost to the nation. but just averting disaster and kicking the can on the tough structural decisions needed to place our economy on sound footing for the future is not enough. we are calling for a framework to build out over the last ten years to reduce the deficit and restructure the fiscal policy. succumb as eventually to bring the budget into balance they must raise
down there and shows people how it's done, to be the united states' ambassador of medical care that wants to partner with these nations, learn about them, learn about their illnesses, learn about their afflictions and learn from the people in the area how we can better support and partner with them. build bridges before they have to. if we have had twice the number of aircraft carers in 9-11, if we had twice the number of marine battalions in 9-11, would that have stopped it? it would not have. but maybe, maybe through humanitarian assistance, disaster relief, global engagement, the ability for us it reach across borders and change minds, maybe the intelligence might have been forthcoming. maybe there was one individual who might have seen something happening and recognizing we can't let bad things happen. that is why we do this. one, we globally engage because it's the right thing to do. we are citizens of the world and we deserve to take care of those less fortunate than us. and we do it because we wapt to increase communications, we want to foster communication because
as well as the united states army and the montana national guard. he earned several recognitions for his valor, including the bronze star medal, purple heart, army commendation medal and army good conduct medal. since 2009, he worked as a full-time instructor with the north dakota national guard's 164th regional training institute camp grafton training center in devil's lake. sergeant first class lindy was a devoted and selfless leader as well as a committed family man. he enjoyed spending time with his family and friends. and he is survived by his wife adrienne and four children. specialist tyler orguard of bismarck, north dakota, joined the north dakota national guard shortly before his 2011 graduation from bismarck century high school, where he was a member of the century patriots wrestling team and began competing in the impact fighting championships. he was passionate about training in mixed martial arts and his family and friends knew him to be an extremely disciplined, hardworking man who served his country with great pride. this was specialist orguard's first overseas deployment.
farm that you're looking at right there to the united states to help boost our nation's seafood supply and economy has been derailed by u.s. federal regulations and now he's being forced to ship his operation somewhere else. we'll tell you where in a moment. why are we driving businesses overseas the way we've done with the oil industry? joining us is the fellow at the competitive enterprise institute, nonpartisan group that studies the economic impact of federal regulations. this guy by the name of brian came up with open blue. what it is, it's a fish farm that he's figured a way to take the nets out into the middle of the ocean and do what? >> what he's able to do is to fish farm not guilty a way that satisfies three important groups. one is the foodies. people who understand the taste of wild fish prefer to have fish raised in open ocean. second is the environmentalist. coastal fish farms are associated with a number of environmental problems, putting it out in deep water washing away all the waste, the fish never swim in the same water twice. he made it economically viable. that me
of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 6, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties f the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader is recognized. mr. reid: following leader remarks, which will be in a period of morning business until 11:45 today. senators will be permitted to speak for up to ten minutes each. we would like that time to be for speeches for our retiring senators. at 11:45, the senate will move to consider the nominations of walker and berg, judges. we expect only two roll call votes since we hope the berg nomination will be confirmed by voice. mr. president, we democr
and 188 aircrafts. that prompted the united states to declare war on japan. it was called a day which will live in em frommy. >> the national autobody counsel honored two veterans by giving them refurbished cars. >> they went to a marine and a navy soldier. they both served in afghanistan. >> and o on maf of other service members rg we appreciate the support and care. >> the group chose the anniversary of the attacks to honor the vets with the recycled rides program hillary clinton said that they are working on political transition. >> the united states stands with the sir yan people in sh syrian people in insisting that there be a unified democratic syria. >> that comes after she met with the russian prime minister. they still disagree on whether the president will have to leave the country as part of any transition, the u.s. wants him out, the russians do not. . >> a child is dead, another person is critically injured, news chopper 2 is live over a big rig crash. >> and in weather, our break in the rain continues. in fact you can't see now but temperatures are dropping off.
to reestablish its claim there by military coercion and that could lead them into a confrontation with the united states' desire to maintain free access. the best way of avoiding that military conflict is what we should see because the military conflict with china would be catastrophic for both nations, indeed for the whole region. so, we want to avoid that. i believe the best way of avoiding that is by maintaining a -- continuing to maintain a strong naval presence in the region, and by having an unambiguous commitment to doing that. i believe that our new national security strategy is that unambiguous commitment, and i believe that the u.s. navy is capable of maintaining that unambiguous military strength. as we sit here this morning aboard the uss macon island, in san francisco bay, looking out to the pacific, it is easy to believe that the united states is, in fact, a pacific power and that to keep it that way we will maintain the best damn navy in the world. thank you very much. (applause)speaker .... >> now i'm going to introduce our next speaker, major general melvin spee splt e i've know
-- archivists here and faculty members in the school of criminal justice. there is no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first death penalty archive. and what we do is we reach out to key organizations, significant individuals who are working either to abolish capital punishment or are proponents of capital punishment. and these individuals and organization form the ideas that frame the debate that goes on both in the legal arena and in the political arena over the death penalty. what i want to show you from the national death penalty archive today is a collection from a gentleman whose name is m. watt espy jr. he is recognized as the foremost historian of the death penalty in the united states. he began doing research on the death penalty in the late 1960s while he was a traveling salesman. became sofas mated with crime and capital punishment, and at that time he was a proponent of the death penalty. but he became so fascinated that he quit his job as a traveling salesman and ded
defenses against that. >> miss yeager, i don't know if you want to say anything from a national guard perspective. >> we have some mobile explorable platforms we can send out to incidents to help provide additional infrastructure in the event everything breaks down then our units have organic communications capability so i can move that out and i can help reinforce cal fire on their incident with what i have in the aviation brigade and units through the state of california have that same communication but the iceu, which is a mobile communications platform, is ideal in events like this to push out to help. >> any other questions? >> i have one. back in 1992 when it was a big fire season and there was a lot of grass, they came to us and i was down at camp pendleton and they asked us it train marines on shovel work. what happened about 6 months later, they ended up sending two battalions to yellowstone. i haven't heard any discussion at all, do you expect the military, the guard or the active forces to be training people to do shovel-like work? all you have talked about so far is av
little experience in history of united states that would allow the navy and the army to work as partners on the singleton. we have to remember the of course the national security act of 1947, post-world war ii phenomenon that created the joint chiefs of staff, secretary of defense. during the civil war, in world war ii there was a secretary of war who was responsible for the army, and secretary of the navy, responsible for the navy who sat as co-equals on the cabinet table and they were members of the coalition press. they were on the same side without a doubt, but they were hardly partners. i became very clear early on to not only was halleck, general can't be done, jealous of his own command. he wanted to keep the forces under his own immediate control which he believed a need to capture this road a. but in addition to navy was equally jealous of partnering with the army. they didn't want to do. secretary of the navy was absolutely determined whenever possible that the navy should do things without upping the army. it was just that they couldn't do without the army. they really saw to
a month of a the cadets beat the midshipman 22-6 in philadelphia. johnny unites and the colts beat the giants in overtime in the greatest game ever played and nfl went from a seasonal side show to a national past time of its own and the money became insane and the guys who went to army in 1958 for that season, those sort of football players stopped looking at the military academy it was the beginning of the end for service academy football. >> up until that day good football players wanted to play football there. >> none of these guys thought about where they were going to play professional football. after 'a 8 after that season that all changed. >> '58 talk about that season, record? >> army went 8 will-oo-1. last one ever to go undefeated. the last ever to be ranked number one. last ever to have a heisman controversy winner which they did in pete dawkins their half back and they beat navy. they beat rice who was a very good team. >> i see a time. >> they tied pittsburgh and mike ditka who was a sophomore then. fourth or fifth game of his college career and he was a force. and arm
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)